Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Pastor's Perspective - What DO You Do?



In the early 80’s when MTV was barely standing up in the crib, and actually played music videos, a rather bizarre British music artist named Adam Ant had a popular video for his song ‘Goody Two Shoes’. The catchy chorus included the lyric, ‘Don’t drink. Don’t smoke. What do you do?’ Barely out of high school, admittedly I liked the hip beat and pretty girls in the clip the best; but, the chorus stuck with me – always has.

I could have been one of the Flying Wallendas! I literally grew up on the balance beam. I lived in the middle tension of being the oldest son in a liberal, fun-loving, stein-rocking Germanic family. On the other side I was a staunch allegiant to a highly conservative channel of Christianity. Polar opposites! But, both somehow scratched a certain itch in me. I became really good on the beam. I adored and took great pride in my European heritage, along with its openness to all things fun and the people who would rather laugh with the sinners than cry with the saints (Joel). Yet, on the other side of the beam, and somehow equally enjoyable, was my engrainment in a channel of faith that took pride in its Spartan adherence to discipline and rule-following. I lived and walked in the daily tension of both – without a net! I was a sinner and a saint. I was a louse and a legalist. In one way I was the drunkard scandalously eating with Jesus. In the other, I was a snazzy-robed Pharisee, mocking Jesus’ choice of dining partners. Simply put, I was a hypocrite –legalism had blinded me to my ominous and metastasizing spiritual condition.

Christianity, in my earliest experience and understanding, was about following God’s ‘Pool Rules’ meticulously, even when the rest of the screaming kids were running around the water’s edge without an adult. Being somehow pleasing to God, was about laws; that He loved the obedient people who read the Bible and color only inside the lines. For me, because I was such a good fair-haired ‘church boy’, in my prideful opinion, I only needed a Nyquil cap of Jesus’ forgiving blood. However, the other people who didn’t know what I knew, do what I did and worship the way I worshiped, all those hell-bound folks, well, they needed the hydrant! Religion was about appearance. It was about impressions. It was fluency in Christianese! It was about knowing the ‘No’s’ – like don’t drink, don’t smoke – including, don’t chew tobacco, and don’t dance with girls who do! Thankfully, through God’s patience, grace and numerous humbling valley experiences throughout my life, I no longer base my righteousness in my flawed efforts and self-imposed righteousness; but instead in something so much better.

As a local pastor trying to help real people like myself, I find that we in the clergy and in nice churches peppered throughout Solano County, are known too prominently for what we say ‘No’ to, than what we say ‘Yes’ to. It’s abundantly clear what we Christians are really against; we’re professionals at making that crystal clear; but, do the people around us know what we are really for? I’m spit-ballin but, could this be why so many hurting people, hemorrhaging from real wounds, avoid the help and message the church was created to offer? Could it stem from the fact that we preach only from the “Anti” side of the ledger?  “Why would I darken the door of a local church? I know what they think about me – my struggles – my attractions – my propensities – my less-than-stellar past. I don’t fit neatly in their box of standards. Why bother?” Could it be that we’ve specialized in what we’re against and have forgotten what we’re for? That somehow beating the ‘Thou Shalt Not’ drum and extending a sturdy Heisman Trophy stiff arm shows the world the open nail-pierced hands of the Savior? Instead, it keeps us in a defensive posture – the bad guys out – the good guys in – and an unraveling world from seeing our own personal and congregational flaws and challenges up close. Recently I shared this quote I heard, “As Christians we despise people who sin differently than we do.” I agree.

If you’re a fundamental Christian reading this, I read the 66-book memo from headquarters too. I know what you’re against. Some of those things are very clear. Some of those things are founded in very gray areas of Scripture. But, my question is, what are you for?

I know I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one (John). I think that if the blood-washed would speak more discerningly, more articulately, more humbly, more gracefully and more lovingly about what we’re for –Who we’re for – What He is for – then perhaps more would see our churches not as cold iron-shrouded bastions of regulations and judgment – but instead what Jesus wants them to be – welcoming hospitals for the spiritually sick.

Don’t drink. Don’t smoke. What do you do?  

2 comments:

sarah duggan said...

I very much enjoyed reading this blog. The line between legalism and following Jesus can sometimes be tricky for me understand; maybe it is my Jewish background. Although I enjoy complex ideas I can get lost in the research of those ideas; the trails they lead to, but what I love about this blog is that it is simple: what am I for? What is Jesus for? Sometimes the simplest ideas are the best catalyst to change.

sarah duggan said...

I very much enjoyed reading this blog. The line between legalism and following Jesus can sometimes be tricky for me understand; maybe it is my Jewish background. Although I enjoy complex ideas I can get lost in the research of those ideas; the trails they lead to, but what I love about this blog is that it is simple: what am I for? What is Jesus for? Sometimes the simplest ideas are the best catalyst to change.